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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)
kicks off his second term with a call for national unity. >> a regional election in germany, a wakeup call for the chancellor. >> and extreme winter weather halts travel across much of northern europe. >> we start this show in washington where president obama balm has publicly taken the oath of office for his second term. he had to take it twice. >> official ceremony held in private on sunday at the white house. now the ceremonial swearing in in front of more than 700,000 people that showed up. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries deman
are coming out on the streets and to vote in an election that matters. >> we'll be live with the latest on the french intervention and where north africa is the new front in the battle against terrorism. and we will be asking why the issue of abortion is still so divided. a special report from mississippi. >> also aaron is taking a look at global unemployment, and that is a huge number, aaron. >> it's a staggering number. 197 million people around the world are now without a jofpblet 13% are under 24. are we creating a generation of non-workers? >> it's 12:00 moon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem where more than 5.5 million israeliings are expected to vote? an election that is expected to see benjamin netanyahu return to office. he is facing relidgeous parties and while security seen by many as netanyahu's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking
level that the last government only introduced before the election. keeping our promise on winter fuel payments, taking all of those steps and making sure, again, something never done by the party opposite that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business
only introduced before the election. keeping our promise. taking all of those steps and making sure that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest. that is a record we should be proud of. >> my constituency is enduring something hideous. thanks to the european union. with my right honorable friend remind us that the british economy -- businesses far less able to cope with -- >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. as mrs. are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just from europe, but more generally. that is why we should be fighting in europe for more flexible europe and a europe where received regulations come off. the view of the party opposite is to sit back, do nothing, and never listen to the british people or business minds. >> order. >> you have been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. western time airs live on c- span2 every wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern, when the house of commons is in session. and again on sunday nights. watch anytime at c-span.org. you can find video of past prime ministers questions and othe
. but the omens are not good. her coalition has just lost a regional election that was widely viewed as a test of public opinion. >> at first, it looked like the german chancellor's party would win. when the final ballots were counted, it became clear the democrats were on their way out. the results show the coalition of angela merkle's party or one seat behind the opposition. the loss by the christian democrats came about because their supporters tried to vote strategically. usually, christian democrat voters cast a ballot for free democrats. at first, they were thrilled at their score. >> i think it is no surprise some conservatives actually gave us a vote to make sure we would be able to continue with the coalition. >> as the votes were counted, it became clear the political blood transfusion had not work. .- worked how could she continued to help the free democrats across germany without hurting her own party poppies -- party potsies popularity. even her star power was not enough to turn things around. keeping the coalition partner ally came at a heavy price, one she may not want to pay ag
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the government, it has not helped the islamists' cause. there's too much fear the country could once again descend into civil war. >> france is reporting some initial successes in mali where government troops had recaptured
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
terrorists. >> elections had been planned for april. that is now completely up in the air. even if the military intervention is a short one, mali is likely to remain politically unstable for some time to come. >> coming up, floods are causing havoc in the indonesian capital. >> first, here's a look at some of the news. >> syrian activists are reporting a new massacre by government forces. the syrian observatory for human rights says pro-assad troops killed more than 100 civilians on tuesday. witnesses are reported as saying troops hunting rebel fighters slotted entire families, including women and children -- slaughtered entire families including women and children. >> new demands come as pakistan's chief anti- corruption official refused the supreme court order to a rust -- arrest the prime minister over lack of evidence. m in the u.s. president's gun control proposals face an uncertain future. there's no majority in either house of congress with resistance from both republicans and democrats. gun supporters have also launched an advertising campaign against obama's move. the p
elections of lower saxony is busy choosing their parliament and the result is looking extremely close. it is being seen as a dress rehearsal for several elections in september and a verdict on chancellor angela merkel herself. david mcalester represents her party and is close to her. the poll suggests is neck-and- neck with the opposition social democrats and the green party. with go live now to hand over. what is the latest you are hearing there? >> the latest we are hearing is that it's going to be a long night. we will have to wait for the regional polling stations to be counted. the parties are really neck-and- neck and it could be angela merkel's christian democratic union or it could be the greens and social democrats. this is a bellwether region. this has farmers, big industry, europe's biggest automaker, volkswagen is located here. the religious split is catholic and protestant. what happens here is will what happened across the country generally speaking. that is why angela merkel made seven campaign stops here along with david mcallister, the christian democratic premier in
to the election if they declare that he dies tomorrow which there is a rumor that they would do that actually going around now, that if he would be declared dead and they called an election within 30 days and the opposition won, meaning the sympathy vote for the candidate which is difficult after what we saw on december 16th and dhaka election we just talked about, chavez has 20 of 23 governors. 11 of the governors that were run by the chavez party are former military officials, including four ministers of defense, who are now governors of their respective states. several of them are all along the office of the control campaign list because of their work with the farc so we have a situation where people are in control of things, so that even if henry embrey de four e elected president in this election it's the opposite -- he's the head of the opposition who ran against chavez and got a 45% to 55% but we are talking about to the even if he was to win, he still would have institutions that are controlled by the chavez government including the supreme court which we just pointed out, including t
election-year in austria, meaning that voters will go to the polls several times. regional parliaments are due to be elected in four of the country's states this spring, followed by the national election of the federal parliament this autumn. it will not be an easy campaign for the traditional parties. they face competition from a political newcomer. some austrian politicians are reminded of a time in the early 1990's when a man came from the far right and meddled with the traditional austrian political landscape. he died four years ago, and his party has since lost some of its significance, but some former supporters have now found a new political home with a new party. >> he who has the gold makes the rules -- that was the model used when introducing the party in the timber. he was born into a poor family in austria but went to canada to make his millions. now he has returned to make a dramatic entrance on the political scene. >> i am certain that this is a very important day that will go down in austrian history. i also think it will go down in the history of the world. >> the recen
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
. this political turmoil comes just months ahead of national elections. >> instead of millions, security officials say it is more like 25,000 protesters gathered in the parliaments in islamabad. there have been isolated clashes, and there was violence as demonstrators reached the heavily fortified area around the parliament building. gunshots were heard, but it was unclear if they were from protesters or police. he is so far unknown in pakistani politics and is demanding the government step down immediately and that a caretaker government be set up to ensure that elections may reflect a truly democratic result. >> this is absolutely laughlin and democratic. we are here in front of the parliamentary house, parliament house, just to say -- save our country from collapse. and he blames the government for incompetence and corruption, and as if on cue, the country's supreme court has now ordered the arrest of the democratically elected prime minister on corruption charges. this is the government has been weak on countering terrorism. -- they say the government has been weak on countering terrorism. >>
be popular, but he is leading a party that is not even registered to take part in the elections and many want to know who is financially backing him. political leaders are working to resolve this crisis. >> there are a lot of suspicion among the government and its coalition, but even among opposition and the main opposition party, that have taken a very strong stand against him. they are saying that whatever he is doing is derailing an attempt -- is attempting to derail democracy. >> pakistan will go to the polls later this year for the first peaceful transition of power under an elected government. some say the march and the prevailing political uncertainty will make that difficult. >> in the u.s., new york state is announcing some of the toughest gun control laws in the country. governor andrew cuomo signed legislation that strengthened the ban on assault weapons and aims to keep guns out of the hands of the mentally ill. >> background checks on all private sales -- smart, because the old system made no sense. if you want to a gun dealer to buy a gun, then you had to go through a background
election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense there's a kind of justification for terrorism. and at the same time there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terror coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. the president was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2009. he chose to deal with militant groups in two ways. he invited them to lay down their weapons to participate in rebuilding the nation. and at the same time he continued cracking down on their activities. observers say this approach has gained broad support amongst the public. >> translator: the government was afraid that negotiating with the kidnappers and making concessions could lead to a loss of legitimacy. so from the historical
is moving to the left very quickly. president obama's election has emboldened many liberals and funding taxpayer abortion, legalized narcotics and gay marriage. overseas the same thing is going on as the left is surging. in rome on sunday a group of gay activists stripped off their searches revealing the words in gay we trust. the pope was in the middle of a public prayer as the protesters tried to shout him down. >> [shouting] >> go with a message to pope to shut up his mouth and not to give his ad vices to those people who decide to legalize gay marriage. >> bill: italian police carried the protesters away but chances are nothing much will happen to them. in france the new socialist president has vowed to enact gay marriage. that has angered some french citizens including the sizeable muslim nation. so also last sunday they took to the streets saying they want traditional marriage to be upheld in france. >> whenever so many people are in the streets, it shows us that it's a law that's not accepted by lots of people. the thing they should do is a eleven dumb. then we will know what peo
. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of candidates for municipal elections is good. but you don't have 50% of women on corporate boards or financial institutions. surveys suggest instituting financial sanctions against companies that did not address these differences. the u.n. committee went to germany 2004, demanded that the federal government had conduct a study on my fathers are not without and to parental leave. it's not just a state policy. it's a national policy. there's not many men taking advantage. why is in a quick sweat as you and start having a qu
as it does today in which very important election held in israel or following the inaugural of president obama and the testimony of secretary clinton. that's a con fluns of events unimaginable, but here it is. does this country seem to be projecting a certain knowledge of its interests and a clear set of policies that make sense to the rest of the world whether it be the middle east, north africa, europe, or asia? >> the government is delusional with issues related to islamist, islamist supremists. we had told again and again that the muslim brotherhood are different than al-qaeda. they are moderates. they are evolved. they are people we can work with. yet, look at the bottom line here. who wants the blind shake back? the demands being made again and again for the release of the terrorist we convicted in the 1990s of atrocities against the united states. the brotherhood and al-qaeda wants him back. what does the brotherhood do as soon as they get into power? impose sharia, what they said they would do and what al-qaeda wants to do. lou: at the very same time while egypt is in increasingl
system for medicare. that was, you know, pretty much trounced during the election. but we'll see. you need something with big numbers in order to -- [inaudible] more or less it's probably a smaller debt ceiling increase. and they also need to decide what to do about two other fiscal cliffs that are looming, the $85 billion in sequester cuts that had been put off for two months for the fiscal cliff deal and also the continuing resolution, government funding runs out march 27th. and if a bill's not passed, the government will shut down. now, some thought that republicans would be more willing to use that weapon to try to force cuts because a government shutdown is several orders of latitude less serious than a debt ceiling default. but, you know, behind the scenes appropriators have been working out their differences, and they could act quickly if leadership decided they didn't want to use that weapon to sort of pass the bill. >> l and finally, eric wasson, you report that the white house has sold paul ryan, the house budget chairman, that its budget will be late, missing the deadline.
first election. he's my date this weekend. >> very nice. i'll see you at the balls. thanks again, star. appreciate it. so kate, got everybody out here. we've got personalities, advocates, politicians, you fame it. folks are coming out, signing up to volunteer, participate, and a lot of folks are attracting them to the tent. >> absolutely. a lot going on the mall today. thank you, suzanne. we'll continue to track all of the events taking place this inauguration weekend but we want to get caught up on other stories making headlines today. john? >> we'll start overseas now. algeria, seven hostages and 11 kidnappers are reported dead today. algerian superb forces had been trying to secure the release of an unknown number of people including americans being held at this gas plant by an al qaeda-linked terror group. lance armstrong admits he cheated and admits he deserved to be punished. the disgraced cyclist told oprah winfrey he does feel remorse for what he did and says cheating cost him sponsorships word about $75 million. he could lose a lot more as sponsors and supporters sue to get so
an election has elected islamists, and they have made it more difficult for the churches of the middle east, who are pretty significant minorities in a lot of these countries. so that has been a bad thing. >> george: tens of thousands of christians are fleeing the middle east because of persecution, yet this modern day exitous is getting little attention in the west. now a jewish group is teaming up with christians to spread the word about persecution of middle east christians. chris mitchell reports. >> reporter: almost 200 million christians face persecution each year, especially in the birthplace of their faith, the middle east. iraq is just one example. >> since 2003, there has been a systematic attack launched against the christian community, and other minorities, in iraq. unfortunately, the mainstream media and many churches really don't talk about the persecution of their brothers and sisters in christ. >> reporter: a syrian christian, julianna, had to be smuggled out of her home country due to religious persecution. she says since the end of saddam hussein reign, it has forced two-t
. to hithe legislature, letting tm know where he stand on it. lou: as you should, you are an elected official as well as sheriff of the county. >> correct, being sheriff is a unique position, only elected law enforcement official in the country. lou: and the sheriffs play a vital role in law enforcement, most people know and are appreciative of. you have expressed concerned about the executive orders of the president, you have concerns about number 6, says public a letter from atf to federally licensed gun dealers providing guidance on how to run background checks on private sellers, they were pretty well prepared if are that letter, weren't they? >> i believe so, that will require a lot more explanation on their part. if that indicates that they are pursuing, prohibiting private sale and transfer, among private parties it will be interesting how they approach that. lou: this is a letter from the justice department, saying, to all who hold licenses, federal firearm licenses, that they are going to be engaged in providing background checks, going to the national background check system of the
in congress. >> the president's approval ratings are higher than at any time since he was first elected. >> and the polls are with the prident. but you make the most important point. nra has had this game all to themselves. they have been able to play it with no money in the game, on the side of people who wanted some sense of gun safety. now with people like gabby giffords, people who can attract funds and target them strategically i think the game is -- >> the president has the national -- we have more power than nra but i believe you were right from the standpoint and being a person who makes law people should come to ts table find out what they do agree on instead of politicizing it. it is a political issue. i think leaders should come together and stop the bipartisan -- with enyou have the nra saying we're against an assault weapons ban, against everything. to me the nra has become nothing more than a shield for the gun manufacturers. if you find out where their finances are coming it's true. they get their membership dues for sure but they get huge monies from gun manufacturers. t
corrupted by the athens. it is an f. us that aims for at political and social elected us in on the one hand, and moral anarchy on the other. you cannot win, but they can make us all losers. to meditate on the meaning of this great contest, we've assembled a distinguished panel of chambers intellectual and moral affairs. you berkowitz is the current senior fellow at the hoovery/ institution where he chairs theo hoover task force on national security and law, and co-chairsk the hoover task force on the virtues of a free society. in the past he served as an associate professor at george mason university school of law, and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. he is the author of virtue and the making of modern liberalism. he holds a jd and a ph.d inñs political science from thisvç institution, an m.a. from hebrew university of jerusalem, and a ba in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz -- i feel silly introducing these people -- norman podhoretz served as editor-in-chief of "commentary" magazine from 1960-1995, and is their current editor at larg
would hope they realize what i understood ebb when i first got elected in 1994. things like -- values like statesmanship and compromise and getting things done were values that people, you know, cherish. that doesn't mean we always got along, we had our battles. but i think the mayors are focused on results. the advise -- advice we would give them is you have a 12% approval rate. there is not much farther down you can go. the time is now to come together and tell a story about a congress that went from the do-nothing congress to a congress that is getting things done in the most pornt issues of our time. i think if they do, both parties will benefit and certainly, the nation will benefit. i say that as mon who needs to compromise on all of these issues. both parties need to understand that people are watching and they expect more from folks here on the beltway. >> when you compromise and you don't walk away with everything you wanted do you still feel like you are successful? >> all the time. you know -- i mean, i used to say they got elected too. the world was not made in my image. w
elections. you may also see a 2/3 majority vote in the senate and in the house if there is some kind of aggressive stance towards guns, because democratic constituents live in some of the most dangerous districts in america. host: a two-thirds vote to undo executive action? caller: if the democrats believe it will hurt their midterm elections, i could see that happening, because i had been getting phone calls from unhappy democrats that live in dangerous districts and they want to be able to protect themselves. host: why are you getting those phone calls? caller: i know democrats. democrats and not been talking about it on television. the house or senate members. it's because they have constituents that support and control, like harry reid's district, so it's a major issue. i believe the background checks at the gun shows, i believe that could pass congress without using executive action. but the fear is there for the people. george bush did it as well, but we have to relinquish the fear. i think, by going through congress and getting it passed by congress, it will be less drama and
to solve our problems. this is inauguration day, much like election day after all the votes are tallied and everyone has a mullen of togetherness, showing a willingness to work together. you still have a very divided washington and washington that is trying to wade through these problems with two very different gun and philosophies, two very different ideas on how to achieve success. lori: the president digging in. you mentioned the philosophy. this proposal being floated about. >> right. this is at three day proposal. three months proposal. excuse me. republicans will vote on it in a few days in the house. it has not gone completely shut down, so we may get at three month extension of the debt ceiling. extending that three months republicans are asking that congress pass a budget to be taken political aim at the u.s. senate because in the u.s. senate they have not passed a budget in a few years. with that they get democrats on the record and the senate with a budget which is something that had been hoping to do politically. they don't have any spending cuts as part of this. another par
election. they're coming off a fiscal debate at the end of the year where they feel like they didn't get anything out of it because they didn't get the spending cuts they want. they have these two things coming up in terms of the budget negotiations. and you have these automatic spending cuts that are set to go into effect at the end of february. they feel like the debt ceiling is going to be... is their leverage. they managed to usity fek tively in 2011 although if you're an economist you would say it wasn't effective and it ended up hurting the economy. politically they felt a little like they had gained some of the things that they want even though ultimately it did have a negative effect on the party. this whole battle is just going to really heat up in the next few weeks. >> woodruff: speaking of the politics of this, jake, the president did say today if this happens he thinks both parties would be blamed but in fact in the polls are showing that it appears most people would blame republicans if this happened. is that... how much is that even a factor among... in the thinking of rep
on what should be done. but you have obviously probably more than any group of elect officials, thought about this issue more intently and longer. you've done great deal of work on this, all you've who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands but i bed if i did a lot of people would put the hand up: how many of you mayors have had to attend the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or a shop owner in your city. many of you have had to attend, and some of you many, too many, such funerals. some of you represent communities that hear experienced mass shootings, not just in schools but in movie theaters and temples, and it's not unique to big cities and urban areas, as we now know. it was pure companiens dense i happened to be literally probably turn out to be a quarter mile ', back in 2006, at an outing, when i heard gunshots in thewoods that we didn't know -- we thought they were hunters. got back to the clubhouse and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish -- small -- small amie, scho
in the background, especially since the election. did he have any say in this or shaping of the policy? >> yes. paul ryan since he's come back to congress from the presidential trail has avoided taking questions and kind of kept his head down. but at this retreat he played a very important role in a couple ways. first of all, he was very active in leading discussions with the republicans when they were trying to decide what their strategy was, and he also came out and talked to reporters and kind of floated this idea of the short-term debt ceiling increase, and he was part of a group of five conservatives who blessed this deal on friday morning. jeb hencer ling of texas and steve of louisiana and jordan of ohio and ryan. so it remains to be seen whether that will be kind of a center of power going forward. host: as far as those five signing on to this deal, what's been talking about the members, especially on the republican side and -- will all of them go along with this? >> it's going to be tough for them, because they have to get 218 votes. the democrats have already signaled they are not going to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)